Join us – Announcing the first OpenTraits workshop – 4-5 August, 2018, New Orleans

We were excited to have our OpenTraits initiative featured in the journal Functional Ecology as part of their blog. You can read more about the feature here. Spanning animal and plant biology – the critical need for an Open Traits initiative across biology August 4-5, 2018, prior to the Ecological Society of America annual meetings, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA   Announcing […]

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Plant Functional Traits Course in Svalbard just announced – apply by April 2018

Plant Functional Traits Course 4 Do you want to travel to over 70 degrees North Latitude? The 4th International Plant Functional Traits Course will be held at the University Centre in Svalbard, Norway, 16-27 July.. The International Plant Functional Traits Courses offer a hands-on experience with collecting and exploring plant functional traits data in a real-life field research project setting, […]

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Discovering Earth’s Botanical Biodiversity via the BIEN R package and GeoSpatial portal – We know remarkably little about what grows where and why

  Life on Earth critically depends on plant life, which forms the base of all terrestrial food webs.  Humanity itself is also critically dependent on plant life for food, fuel, medicine, shelter and numerous other uses.  However, despite the critical importance of plants, we know remarkably little about them.   Surprisingly, the basic properties of most plant species are still […]

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Lab Talks at the 2017 Ecological Society of America meetings

Many of us are up in Portland Oregon for the 2017 ESA meetings. Here is a listing of the various talks and posters we will be presenting. Do stop by and see us and say hi! Enquist Lab ESA Talks https://eco.confex.com/eco/2017/webprogram/authore.html ====== Monday, August 7, 2017 ============================================= 2:30 PM Portland Blrm 258, Oregon Convention Center OOS 5-4 – An energetic approach to variation in leaf and microbial functional traits across climate gradients Sean T. Michaletz1,2, Vanessa R. Buzzard3, Ye Deng4, Zhili He5, Daliang Ning6, Lina Shen7, Qichao Tu5, Michael D. Weiser8, Michael Kaspari8, Jizhong Zhou5, Robert B. Waide9 and Brian J. Enquist10, https://eco.confex.com/eco/2017/webprogram/Paper62588.html 2:50 PM D138, Oregon Convention Center COS 20-5  Why do leaf venation networks have loops? Testing hypotheses with an Andes-Amazon elevation gradient Benjamin W. Blonder, University of Arizona; Norma Salinas, Universidad San Antonio Abad del Cusco; Lisa Patrick Bentley, Sonoma State University; Alexander Shenkin, University of Oxford; Percy Chambi Porroa, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco; Yolvi Valdez Tejeira, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco; Tatiana Boza Espinoza, University of Zurich; Gregory R. Goldsmith, Paul Scherrer Institute; Lucas Enrico, University of Cordoba; Roberta Martin, Carmegie Institution; Gregory P. Asner, Carnegie Institution for Science; Sandra Díaz, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal; Brian J. Enquist, University of Arizona; Yadvinder Malhi, University of Oxford https://eco.confex.com/eco/2017/webprogram/Paper64877.html   ====== Tuesday ==========================================================   8:40 AM B114, Oregon Convention Center COS 45-3 – Spectroscopy of canopy foliar traits: Can airborne […]

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The Taxonomic Name Resolution Service (TNRS) is six years old. Is it still useful? 40,000 users and counting.

  Back in 2010 we prepared to release a tool to assist ecologists and botanists in the standardization of their plant names. The tool is the Taxonomic Name Resolution Service – and since that time we have come to depend on it almost every day in the lab and in our various collaborations. In short, the TNRS can resolve many […]

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New postdoc position – Trait-based ecology, ecophysiology, and remote sensing

The Enquist lab is looking for a new postdoctoral position to start spring 2017 Postdoctoral Position – The College of Science at the University of Arizona is seeking to fill a position in trait-based ecology, ecophysiology, and remote sensing. This postdoc will be based in the Enquist lab at the University of Arizona but will primarily work closely with an interdisciplinary group […]

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Two New Postdoctoral Positions ! – (1) Macroecology of land plant biodiversity: Niche evolution and ecological limits; (2) Tropical Ecology: Experimental Trait-based ecology of tropical forest ecosystems

The Enquist lab has positions for two new postdoctoral positions to start fall 2016 (1) Postdoctoral Position –  Macroecology of land plant biodiversity: Niche evolution and ecological limits. The College of Science at the University of Arizona is seeking to fill a position in Plant Macroecology and trait-based niche evolution.  This position, funded by the National Science Foundation, will work closely with an interdisciplinary group of researchers associated with the University of Arizona (Enquist Lab), Kenyon College (Andrew Kerkhoff), and Wesleyan University (Dana Royer) together with international collaborators from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN). We are looking for a candidate to investigate the fundamental ecological and evolutionary processes that generate continental-scale variation in plant biodiversity. The post-doc’s main responsibility will be to lead integration of plant diversity, macroecology, plant trait, and climate measures associated with the biogeography of plant diversity.  The successful candidate will lead a novel research program that leverages the BIEN database, the largest botanical dataset in existence, with information on the distribution, ecology, and evolutionary history of more than 100,000 plant species in North and South America. The candidate will take advantage of computational advances in biodiversity informatics, phylogenetic analysis, and multivariate niche modeling to investigate how the evolutionary contingencies of adaptation, diversification, and dispersal
interact with possible ecological limits on the ‘niche space’ of different environments. The main goals of this position are to test whether the colonization of novel environments is limited by niche evolution, and whether less physiologically favorable environments actually impose hard ecological limits on the number of plant species they can support. The unprecedented scale of […]

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What will be the future of western mountain ecosystems? The Effect of the Foresummer Drought on Carbon Exchange in the Subalpine

Since 2003 my group has been conducting a set of long-term observations and experiments up at the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab. It is a fantastic place filled with an impressive set of visiting scientists and colleagues as well as a diverse, lush, and striking mountains. It is typical Colorado – green and filled with flowers in the summer. However, during the […]

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Even the best ecoinformatics tool requires a skilled hand: Best practices for taxonomic name resolution in biodiversity science

Even the best ecoinformatics tool requires a skilled hand: Best practices for taxonomic name resolution in biodiversity science Increasingly, informatics approaches in biology and ecology are realizing that ‘Names are key to the big new biology‘. Did you know that in many large biological, ecological, and evolutionary datasets and databases contained on the order of 50% of their species names […]

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